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family members behaviour


assisting those with family members in distress

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family members behaviour


assisting those with family members in distress

Family Carers who assist individuals with challenging behaviour

 

de-escalation training for parents and family members

  • Do you ever find your child displays difficult behaviour?
  • Is any behaviour impacting on relationships within the family?
  • Would you like information on being safer for all?
  • Would you like training and practical solutions?
 
I found my training experience with De-Escalate to be extremely valuable. It is evidence based, clearly explained and taught and the situation is always seen from the point of view of the distressed person as well which really helps. I would very much like to do more of this training and if I can I will definitely be back. Thanks so much.
— H.M. Parent
 

Working with indiviudals in distress d8.is/b2 (rather than challenging behaviour) can be stressful for us as carers.

When a family member is in distress it can be incredibly stressful to maintain an ongoing positive relationship.

Any relationship has stressful times and having that stress within the family can be hard for others to understand, however in your home an individual in distress can put pressure on all aspects of family life. Child development only plays a part. Relationships are the key to successful family life.

D.ESCAL8 TM family workshops are fully bespoke to the needs of the participants rather than following a set syllabus. Workshops are underpinned by specifically designed techniques to assist you to develop positive relationships with family members in distress.

 
 
I highly recommend the training to any professional who works with children where their presentation needs to be safely managed in such a way that actually supports that young person and staff. The training was very refreshing, providing new ways to manage a range of behaviours. This is done by first fully understanding the Young Persons needs through close analysis of ‘why’ the Young Person presents in a particular way. We were also able to link presentation to other issues such as sensory, communication and also routines. By fully understating this first, we are able to taylor our approach resulting in incidents being carefully and safely managed. By understanding first the person’s needs, we were able to taylor our approach to de-escalate before any physical intervention. The ethos around any physical intervention has been well thought out and tested. The training was delivered very well and has supported my ability as a practitioner so keep myself and the Young People safe.
— L.C. - NQSW/Social Worker/ASW Practitioner
Brilliant course. It has given me the confidence to remain calm when my son is very upset - keeping calm is the best thing for him.
— C.P. -parent
Very worthwhile three days - gave me additional skills and a greater sense of confidence in my caring role and made some new friends too. I’d recommend this to anyone interested in providing good quality care.
— M.G. -parent
 
 
 
 
I attended the two day parent and family course with my older son and my younger son’s PA. As well as having a son with autism I work in a special school, so am trained in the Team Teach approach. Before the course, I did wonder how different it would be to what I already knew. We have many strategies in place at home for trying to de-escalate my son’s behaviour, many of which work well, but the occasional times when he has been completely out of control in the last year have had an enormous emotional impact on us as a family and on the way we interact with him for a while after the event. As he is extremely sensitive to the moods of others, this then had a negative effect on his behaviour.

The most positive part of the course for me was the emotional resilience it built in dealing with physical behaviours. The idea of ‘staying in the moment’ when a child is distressed, rather than immediately employing avoidance or escape techniques, was particularly helpful.

Des is a brilliant trainer and put everyone at their ease, including my 15 year old son, who learnt a huge amount. It was also great to have Chris presenting from a parent’s point of view - the videos and discussion around them were very useful.

Perhaps most significantly, we have not had any major outbursts from my younger son since we attended two weeks ago, despite changes of staff at school and our house being upside down with building work. I am positive that this is a result of subtle changes in the way we react when he is beginning to show signs of distress. I have fed back to his class staff at school and they have also reported positively about his behaviour. He just seems more relaxed; I think because we are. So thank you Des and Chris. We are looking forward to a refresher next year!
— S.P. Parent & Teacher
 

Parent & Family Trainer

Christianne has a teenage son with severe autism who is non-verbal and has severe learning disabilities. She has a background in studying interactions of children with severe autism using a methodology called Conversation Analysis (CA) and has presented this work at international conferences. Together with Tim Auburn at the University of Plymouth she has published a chapter in a book looking at the ways children with severe autism use laughter to joke and tease.  She is now working on using CA to provide useful feedback to people working with or caring for children and  adults with severe autism. Her own experiences of managing her son’s distressed behaviours and the huge difference D.ESCAL8 training made to her family motivated discussion about providing these opportunities for other families. She is committed to working with other families to improve the lives of people living with and affected by distressed behaviours.

In her spare time she enjoys horse riding, walking on Dartmoor with the dog and surfing.

 
Dad and I just wanted to send a quick message to say thank you for the bespoke training course you ran around our son. Having a course aimed at children and run for children’s services made it all very relevant and specific, in a way the general course just cannot be. As you are aware things were becoming pretty tricky at home, and Dad and I were struggling to manage our son’s frequent outbursts.

It was very helpful to us that you spent so much time in our home, observing (and helping us manage) his outbursts. Consultants we have dealt with in the past have taken a step back and not been keen to spend too much time hands on in the home and it was refreshing and really very different to have someone with us not afraid to join us and really demonstrate how to manage an extreme outburst (I hope your bruises are getting better by the way – since doing the course we have not had our daily top up as incidents are just not escalating in the same way – so yours may be the last ones dished out for a while!).

Although I had tried to explain PBS to Dad, it was much clearer coming from you, and it has really helped us work together and stay calm (which of course helps our son).

I have emailed the Council Childrens Services to thank them for funding the course, and for getting the whole team together – it was incredibly helpful to have everyone involved in our son’s care across school, home and respite on the same course.

We really are very grateful for everything you have done. We’d appreciate it if you could add us to an email list for refresher courses – I suspect that at some stage we will find it handy to revisit everything we have learned.
— C.P. Parent (written prior to joining D8)

Publications & Talks

Book chapter: Christianne Pollock, Timothy Auburn, (2013), “Laughter and competence: Children with severe autism using laughter to joke and tease”, In Studies of laughter in interaction (Phillip Glenn, Elisabeth Holt, eds.), Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 135-60.

Pollock, C. and Auburn T. Joking in teaching contexts by children with severe autism. International Conference on Conversation Analysis, 4-8 July 2010, Mannheim, Germany,

Pollock, C. and Auburn T. ‘Laughter is the shortest distance between two people’ (Victor Borge). Laughter in the interactions of children with severe autism. International Conference on Laughter and Humour in Interaction. Huddersfield, 24-25 June 2009

Pollock, C, Auburn, T., Clibbens, J. and Phillips, C. (2008) Interactions of Children with Severe Autism. International Meeting for Autism Research, London, England. 15th – 17th May, 2008

 
 
 
 

D.ESCAL8™ BILD Accredited Courses:

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Adults

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Children and Young People

In house Trainers Project

 
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Autism Awareness


autism awareness understanding of differences and diversity

Autism Awareness


autism awareness understanding of differences and diversity

Autism Awareness Training

This course is a one day course giving an introduction to autism and the acceptance of Autistic people.

The following is aPeek at the content of the day.

Autism has no physical signs but affects the way individuals perceive and interact with the world. Neurotypical people can have difficulty with acceptance and understanding the differences an autistic person experiences. With more than 700,000 people in the UK thought of as having autism, a general understanding of the differences is essential.

Autism manifests itself in a huge number of ways leading to a condition that is as individual to each autistic person as you are individually different to this author. It is mainly public perception that has linked autism and distress. Therefore, while there are some catch all understandings around autism, the main focus should be on very individualised approaches to caring for and enabling people.

When the Training Needs Analysis highlights a need this area of care is covered in the BILD Accredited course ‘Developing Positive Relationships with Individuals in Distress’.

When working with an autistic individual who has difficulty self regulating their emotional state D.ESCAL8TM can assist staff to work more consistently gaining more understanding of autism and Distress.

Aim

Participants get an overview of the characteristics of autism

Objectives

  • Participants understand how their thinking and processing may differ from an autistic individual
  • Participants understand that the individual sensory profile may highlight and inform how the person's needs should be taken into account during planning
  • Participants accept that their own lives have elements other people would find obsessive / ritualistic
  • Participants gain an understanding of causes of autism
  • Participants understand the need for sensory assessments
  • Participants understand how to take into account the differences in the autistic experience in writing plans

overview

Autism is not a single condition. It's actually a spectrum of conditions. These days, one in 88 children will be diagnosed with autism, over time the definition of autism has been widened. These disorders are characterized, in varying degrees by difficulties, or differences from neurotypical people, in:

  • social interaction
  • verbal and nonverbal communication
  • repetitive behaviors

However as the term is a spectrum there are huge variations in the manner it manifests and the behaviours that are experienced by autistic people in distress

Sensory differences can be a large area within the autistic condition. sensory difficulties are common and vary widely.

Autistic people can experience differences in thinking, perception and learning styles.

All of the above can be factors in an individual's ability to self regulate. This can lead to individual distress.

Diagnostics

With the May 2013 publication of the DSM-5 diagnostic manual, all autism disorders were merged into one umbrella diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Previously, they were recognized as distinct subtypes, including:

  • Autistic disorder
  • Childhood disintegrative disorder
  • Pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)
  • Asperger syndrome In the UK ICD-10 is mainly used for diagnosis which still has the separate diagnoses.

What does cause autism?

In fact, there's probably not one single answer. However today there is a widely held understanding that autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a biological basis. It seems to be mostly genetics - although it is not crystal clear so we cannot just run a genetic test!

More depth is covered during the BILD Accredited course ‘Developing Positive Relationships with Individuals in Distress’ an overview is found here

I really enjoyed this course, for years I have always felt that there were more positive ways out there to deal with these behaviours. Des made the course interesting and I used some of the things I was taught on my next day at work and saw some big improvements over the next week.
— L.D.

D.ESCAL8™ BILD Accredited Courses:

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Adults

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Children and Young People

In house Trainers Project

 
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autism and distress


assisting individuals manage autism and distress

autism and distress


assisting individuals manage autism and distress

Autism and Distress

Autism has no physical signs but affects the way individuals perceive and interact with the world. Neurotypical people can have difficulty with acceptance and understanding the differences an autistic person experiences. With more than 700,000 people in the UK thought of as having autism, a general understanding of the differences is essential.

Autism manifests itself in a huge number of ways leading to a condition that is as individual to each autistic person as you are individually different to this author. It is mainly public perception that has linked autism and distress. Therefore, while there are some catch all understandings around autism, the main focus should be on very individualised approaches to caring for and enabling people.

When the Training Needs Analysis highlights a need this area of care is covered in the BILD Accredited course ‘Developing Positive Relationships with Individuals in Distress’.

When working with an autistic individual who has difficulty self regulating their emotional state D.ESCAL8TM can assist staff to work more consistently gaining more understanding of autism and Distress.

 

Aim

Participants get an overview of the characteristics of autism and how these effect de-escalation

Objectives

  • Participants understand how their thinking and processing may differ from an autistic individual
  • Participants understand that the individual sensory profile may highlight and inform how the person's needs should be taken into account during planning and implementation of any physical intervention
  • Participants accept that their own lives have elements other people would find obsessive / ritualistic
  • Participants gain an understanding of causes of autism
  • Participants understand the need for sensory assessments
  • Participants understand how to take into account the differences in the autistic experience in writing plans
 

overview

Autism is not a single condition. Autism and distress do not automatically go together. It's actually a spectrum of conditions. These days, one in 88 children will be diagnosed with autism, over time the definition of autism has been widened. These disorders are characterized, in varying degrees by difficulties, or differences from neurotypical people, in:

  • social interaction
  • verbal and nonverbal communication
  • repetitive behaviors

However as the term is a spectrum there are huge variations in the manner it manifests and the behaviours that are experienced by autistic people in distress

Sensory differences can be a large area within the autistic condition. sensory difficulties are common and vary widely.

Autistic people can experience differences in thinking, perception and learning styles.

All of the above can be factors in an individual's ability to self regulate. This can lead to individual distress.

 

Diagnostics

With the May 2013 publication of the DSM-5 diagnostic manual, all autism disorders were merged into one umbrella diagnosis of Autistic Spectrum Disorder. Previously, they were recognized as distinct subtypes, including:

  • Autistic disorder
  • Childhood disintegrative disorder
  • Pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS)
  • Asperger syndrome In the UK ICD-10 is mainly used for diagnosis which still has the separate diagnoses.
 

What does cause autism?

In fact, there's probably not one single answer. However today there is a widely held understanding that autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a biological basis. It seems to be mostly genetics - although it is not crystal clear so we cannot just run a genetic test!

 

More depth is covered during the BILD Accredited course ‘Developing Positive Relationships with Individuals in Distress’ an overview is found here

 
Very good course. Trainer was knowledgeable and enthusiastic & made the 3 days enjoyable + interesting.
— D.S.
 

D.ESCAL8™ BILD Accredited Courses:

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Adults

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Children and Young People

In house Trainers Project

 
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Education Children & young people


assisting carers manage children and young people in distress

Education Children & young people


assisting carers manage children and young people in distress

Education - Children and Young People in distress

Working with indiviudals in distress d8.is/b2 can be stressful for us as educators and carers. It is important for us to gain an understanding of child development.

This is a fully BILD accredited 3 day foundation course.

For Bespoke Inset days also see these links.

 
I highly recommend the training to any professional who works with children where their presentation needs to be safely managed in such a way that actually supports that young person and staff. The training was very refreshing, providing new ways to manage a range of behaviours. This is done by first fully understanding the Young Persons needs through close analysis of ‘why’ the Young Person presents in a particular way. We were also able to link presentation to other issues such as sensory, communication and also routines. By fully understating this first, we are able to taylor our approach resulting in incidents being carefully and safely managed. By understanding first the person’s needs, we were able to taylor our approach to de-escalate before any physical intervention. The ethos around any physical intervention has been well thought out and tested. The training was delivered very well and has supported my ability as a practitioner so keep myself and the Young People safe.
— L.C. -NQSW/Social Worker/ASW Practitioner
 
 

D.ESCAL8™ BILD Accredited Courses:

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Adults

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Children and Young People

In house Trainers Project

 

The foundation course content covers the full 3 day Accredited course including Physical Disengagement and Restrictive Physical Intervention

The content below and all testimonials are taken from a one day introduction for educators working in a PRU setting.

 
Disruptive pupil behaviour is a frustration for many teachers. In fact, 70% of teachers told us they had considered quitting the profession over poor behaviour
— Teacher Support Network and Family Lives Behaviour survey 2010
 

Behaviour & Disruption

What behaviours and how they effect us and education

  • Low Level
  • High Level
 

What sort of educator are you?

Discussion of types of responses to behaviour that is disruptive and the effects of these responses.

 
Study of over 100 reports on classroom management, including 134 experiments designed to find the most successful classroom strategies as well as finding that pupils prefer the dominant-cooperative style mix twice as much as the purely cooperative style or indeed any other style
— Robert Marzano’s (2003)
 

Strategies

Throught the workshop we discuss classroom management strategies as well as crisis management strategies - these actions must;

  • meet the pupil’s needs
  • encourage the pupil to make positive choices and develop self-control
  • support the pupil in difficult situations
  • safely manage crises if and when they occur

There are four basic approaches, which research has found to improve classroom behaviour:

  1. Rules and procedure
  2. Teacher-pupil / student relationships
  3. Disciplinary interventions
  4. Mental set
 

Sometimes a cycle can develop between the teacher and the students that makes things even worse: the pupils misbehave more, you dislike them more, you are less positive and friendly, they dislike you and your classes more, they disrupt more and so it goes on. The cycle needs to be broken.

 

Tolerance, Resilience & Relationships

Staff support systems - Emotion & Relationships

Low Arousal Approaches and other Psychological Principles

A round up of classroom mangement strategies

 

Although there are many reasons why a person may present with challenging behaviour, researchers and clinicians have found it helpful to consider function in relation to the following four categories:

  • Social Attention
  • Tangible
  • Escape
  • Sensory / Automatic
 
I thought as a refresher course the content was absolutely spot on. Des was able to adapt to the specific needs and queries of the group very easily and I felt that the staff all had positive outcome from the day.
— S.J. - Service Director
 

D.ESCAL8™ BILD Accredited Courses:

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Adults

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Children and Young People

In house Trainers Project

 
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Positive Behaviour Support


introductory level positive behaviour support training

Positive Behaviour Support


introductory level positive behaviour support training

Positive Behaviour Support, Introductory Level

Positive behaviour support is a framework at the heart of the D.ESCAL8 training - delivering all care in a supportive and positive way even in crisis.

 
“The course was well delivered and it reinforced the low arousal approach that we advocate and support here. Highly recommended!
— M.C. – Service Director

Participants are encouraged to put this approach at the centre of all care they provide and in all the work they do with individuals.

The following are paramount:

  • We should NOT try to control other people, but should support them in their own behaviour change process.
  • There is a reason behind most behaviour that seems challenging, such as meeting an unmet need.
  • Every person has unique strengths and talents that can be utilised.
  • Everyone should be treated with compassion and respect regardless of their behaviour.
  • Everyone is entitled to quality of life and effective service.
  • Knowledge and commitment about how to provide support for positive behaviour can make a big difference.
  • Positive responses will be more effective than coercion and punishment.
 

Overview of the Positive Behavioural Support Competence Framework

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The BILD Code of Practice defines positive behaviour support as ‘a framework; that enhances the quality of life for the individual and others involved in their life for developing an understanding of challenging behaviour that is developed with full inclusion of the individual and their family/advocate to develop, implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a personalised and enduring system of support

The training teaches and discusses primary and secondary prevention strategies, with the overall principle that all prevention strategies should be carefully selected and reviewed to ensure that they do not constrain opportunities or have an adverse effect on the welfare or the quality of life of anyone involved.

 

Aim:

  • Participants understand positive behaviour support and the reasons to work within this framework at all times.

Objectives:

  • Participants gain an overview of the content of Positive Behavioural Support Competence Framework.
  • Participants understand the definition of and the concept of positive behaviour support
  • Participants understand primary and secondary preventions and can give examples
  • Participants understand the factors that contribute to the development of behaviours that challenge and the functions of behaviour
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emotional resilience


emotional resilience


Any interaction in any industry can be stressful. D.ESCAL8 run workshops for places of work to build emotional resilience within your staff group. The Positive Psychology movement has grown to focus on what is going well for individuals rather than the standard psychology focus of what is wrong with the individual. This leads to us needing to focus on the concept of well-being.

 

Emotional Resilience

Developing strategies around emotional resilience leads your staff to have the power to bounce back quicker, than previously, in the face of perceived and actual obstructions and the ability to see and act on opportunities earlier as they are less focused on a "problem" and more robust to difficulties.

I really enjoyed this course, for years I have always felt that there were more positive ways out there to deal with these behaviours. Des made the course interesting and I used some of the things I was taught on my next day at work and saw some big improvements over the next week.
— L.D.
  • What is meant by resilience?

  • Overview – Resilience, Stress and Performance

  • Recognising the signs and symptoms of stress and burn-out

  • Practical skills for building stress resilience

  • Integrating resilience skills into the working day

  • When do we need to call on our resilience

  • Understanding who we are - clarify personal vision and goals

  • Deepening Resilience - exercises on strengthening relationships, improving problem solving abilities, and building self confidence.

  • A personalised plan

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Elderly and dementia


assisting carers to manage elderly or dementia and distress

Elderly and dementia


assisting carers to manage elderly or dementia and distress

Elderly or dementia and distress

Working with indiviudals in distress d8.is/b2 can be stressful for us as carers. Within an older population it is important for carers to gain an understanding of some of the effects ageing can have. D.ESCAL8™ hope this overview will give an introduction to the myriad of changes a person goes through later in life.

The ageing senses

With age our senses change and decrease. This affects our vision, hearing, touch, smell and taste. This can affect the way that we perceive the information coming from our senses and can be frightening and conflicts can occur with what we see and hear and what we perceive.

Vision can be affected by the perception of colour and it’s harder to see the contrast between colours, reduced peripheral vision, smaller visual field, less able to tolerate glare, sharpness of the vision deteriorates (visual acuity) and decreased pupil size so they are less able to take in light. This reduction in our vision can be very confusing and you may notice the individuals may wear brighter coloured clothing, may not be able to get to the bathroom in time, or losing their way around the building due to sight issues.

Hearing is affected with the loss of high frequency hearing, and they may have tinnitus. Hearing also affects balance so individuals are more likely to fall. Individuals may not be able to hear the higher notes in a tune, or female carers’ voices as they tend to be softer and higher in pitch. Hearing noises that are not present in the environment can be distracting and will interfere with normal hearing.

Taste declines including less sensitivity to sweet and salty tastes. The sense of smell diminishes after the age of 70. Taste and smell can also be affected by medications. As individuals may feel their food tastes bland which can lead to malnutrition. Individuals may not notice that they need a wash if their smell has declined or that their clothes haven’t been washed or the smell of the food. You may notice that individuals are having more sugar in their tea or putting more salt on their dinner. Food could be adapted with herbs, and spices to enhance the flavour and colour. We can also use brighter coloured dishes and cups to enable individuals to see the food. You may find that individuals will eat more if they can see it and if it tastes good to them.

Touch may be reduced or changed with aging, individuals are less able to detect vibration and pressure which increases the risk of injuries. They may have a reduced sensitivity to pain or an increased sensitivity to light touch. The individual may experience problems with walking due to the reduced ability to perceive where your body is in relation to the floor. Watching for signs of pain by flinching or facial expression is important as if they have dementia, stroke or Parkinson disease they may not be able to tell you they are in pain or may not be able to find the words.

What is dementia?

The term 'dementia' describes a set of symptoms which include loss of memory, mood changes, and problems with communication and reasoning and it affects 800,000 people in the UK. Damage to the brain occurs by certain diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and damage caused by a series of small strokes. Dementia is progressive, which means the symptoms will gradually get worse. How fast dementia progresses will depend on the individual person and what type of dementia they have. Each person is unique and will experience dementia in their own way. It is often the case that the person's family and friends are more concerned about the symptoms than the person may be themselves.

Symptoms of dementia may include the following:

  • Loss of memory - this particularly affects short-term memory, for example forgetting what happened earlier in the day, not being able to recall conversations, being repetitive or forgetting the way home from the shops. Long-term memory is usually still quite good.
  • Mood changes - people with dementia may be withdrawn, sad, frightened or angry about what is happening to them.
  • Communication problems - including problems finding the right words for things, for example describing the function of an item instead of naming it.

In the later stages of dementia, the person affected will have problems carrying out everyday tasks and will become increasingly dependent on other people.

More information about dementia is available on the Alzheimer’s Society website.

Dementia affects more than a person’s memory, it can also affect the following:

  • What people see, or interpret what they see
  • What people hear, or how they interpret what they hear
  • The language and words people use (they may think they are using the right word for something when they are not)
  • How people react to things and their emotions
  • How people relate to others
  • The things people are able to do: walking, eating, co-ordination, etc.
  • Physical ability / habits
    • swallowing
    • knowing when they need the toilet
    • knowing when to sleep etc.

Dementia care and distress

As carers working with older people with dementia you will be involved in looking for the reason for, or the triggers to behaviours. Many of the individuals you work with may not be able to verbally express how they are feeling, what they want or need, so you will need to know about the individual's history and be observant to help them when they become distressed. Knowing how to distract an individual as some may think they need to pick up children from school, cook tea, go shopping, go to work, things that in their adult life they would have done. Reassuring them is very important so that they won’t worry.

As the disease progresses and an individual will become more dependent it is still important that we encourage the individual to maintain their independence and give them a sense of purpose. Encouraging an individual to complete tasks that they are able to do is important i.e. folding napkins, cooking, etc this will be individual per person. Finding out the music that they like and playing it for them, reminiscing using their family photos or objects this is especially important as their mobility decreases. Placing objects of interest to that person where they can see them and encouraging any speech where possible. This could be sorting through a handbag, showing a dvd about a place that is important to them, triggers to stimulate a memory.

 
The course was well delivered and it reinforced the low arousal approach that we advocate and support here. Highly recommended!
— M.C. – Service Director

D.ESCAL8™ BILD Accredited Courses:

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Adults

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Children and Young People

In house Trainers Project

 
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Fostering kids in distress


assisting foster carers with kids in distress

Fostering kids in distress


assisting foster carers with kids in distress

fostering kids in distress

Working with indiviudals in distress d8.is/b2 (rather than challenging behaviour) can be stressful for us as carers. Fostering brings children into your home to be part of your family.

Any relationship has stressful times and bringing a child into your home can put pressure on all aspects of family life. Child development only plays a part.

 

Relationships - the key to successful placements.

As children are likely to have had many disappointments, and a lack of that constant emotional gate post they need, relationships and the support for the carer to develop those positive relationships are the key.

 

Our parent and family workshops are specifically designed to assist you to develop positive relationships with children in distress.

 
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D.ESCAL8™ BILD Accredited Courses:

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Adults

3 day Foundation Developing Positive Relationships with individuals in distress – Children and Young People

In house Trainers Project

 
I highly recommend the training to any professional who works with children where their presentation needs to be safely managed in such a way that actually supports that young person and staff. The training was very refreshing, providing new ways to manage a range of behaviours. This is done by first fully understanding the Young Persons needs through close analysis of ‘why’ the Young Person presents in a particular way. We were also able to link presentation to other issues such as sensory, communication and also routines. By fully understating this first, we are able to taylor our approach resulting in incidents being carefully and safely managed. By understanding first the person’s needs, we were able to taylor our approach to de-escalate before any physical intervention. The ethos around any physical intervention has been well thought out and tested. The training was delivered very well and has supported my ability as a practitioner so keep myself and the Young People safe.
— L.C. -NQSW/Social Worker/ASW Practitioner
I have to say that in our profession we are often given models of intervention to use and the theory behind them, but applying them in reality often fails. Your course helped me challenge my own belief system in understanding the psychological impact of ‘power’ in applying re-enforcement theory for children and young people with Learning disabilities. Your course provides a realistic interpretation of the work environment and how to remain calm and it certainly tests participants! Listening to your own experience and your realistic role plays certainly causes you to reflect on your own practice and how you will go forward to help carers in their roles. Thank you.
— K.Z. - Supervising Social Worker
 
 

D8 family project on this link

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Dual Diagnosis - Mental Health & Learning Disabilities


assisting carers manage mental health and distress

Dual Diagnosis - Mental Health & Learning Disabilities


assisting carers manage mental health and distress

Mental Health & Learning Disabilities

A one day course on Dual Diagnosis.

Dual Diagnosis is a term that is used in many different areas however in the field we work in we are specifically discussing people who have a Learning Disability and may experience Mental Health issues.

Aim

for staff to be able to effectively support people who have a learning disability and are also experiencing mental health problems

Objectives:

  • understanding of the common features of the main types of mental illness
  • effects of the main types of mental illness on the individual and their quality of life
  • understanding of the possible differences in the way mental illness may present in people who already have a learning disability
  • practical approaches to support people during episodes of mental illness

The workshop is intersperced with exercises, video, presentaiton and discussion.